Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Orel el Vie Nov 13, 2020 3:34 pm

Estoy de acuerdo, Chorbis.

Aparte, la OTAN recibe en Italia su quinto y último RQ-4D Global Hawk:
https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news ... ix-ags-uav
http://alert5.com/2020/11/13/nato-has-t ... nal-rq-4d/

Y Nigeria recibirá en breve ocho Wing Loong II chinos (ocho, no cuatro Predators B). Ironía: espero que no armados, porque si no hasta Nigeria tiene UCAS antes que nosotros además del doble. (Ya sé, que las dos fuerzas aéreas no son comparables, pero ya sabéis por dónde voy).
https://twitter.com/JanesINTEL/status/1 ... 6323769345

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor champi el Sab Nov 14, 2020 8:23 am

Contrato para desarrollar e integrar nuevas capacidades en los Protector británicos (12/11/2020): https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contra ... e/2413459/
...
General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., Poway, California, has been awarded an $81,866,402 cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price modification (P00014) to contract FA8620-18-C-2009 for the U.K. MQ-9B Protector program. This modification provides for the design, development, integration and component-level testing of additional capabilities being added to the baseline program. Work will be performed in Poway, California, and is expected to be completed Aug. 31, 2021. Total cumulative face value of the contract is not-to-exceed $174,889,865. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $71,563,692 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.
...
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor poliorcetes el Sab Nov 14, 2020 2:26 pm




La serie de este chaval es asombrosa. Iteración tras iteración hasta diseñar y mantener un UAV desde componentes que vuela 166km con energía solar :shock:

Y nosotros enterrando miles de millones en cosas
Nunca digas que éste es mi último sendero
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Sab Nov 14, 2020 4:01 pm

Mas imágenes del ejercito chino practicando la entrega de munición y otros materiales con drones.
https://twitter.com/dronesdeguerra/stat ... 36544?s=20

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Sab Nov 14, 2020 5:09 pm

French Army To Test Small Drones That Can Detect, Intercept, And Possibly Jam Communications
The French Ministry of Defense’s Project Sauron is now calling for industry proposals for small electronic warfare-enabled drones.
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/3 ... unications
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Dom Nov 15, 2020 2:08 pm

Según algunas fuentes, el UAV VT-Pigeon construido en Vietnam acaba de comenzar la producción en masa. Ahora que es más que un prototipo, arrojemos algo de luz sobre el modelo:
1/12

Hilo: https://twitter.com/jesusfroman/status/ ... 4998242306

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Dom Nov 15, 2020 6:19 pm

https://twitter.com/jesusfroman/status/ ... 05120?s=20
"Algeria 54", una producción bajo licencia del "Yabhon Flash-20" (Emiratos Árabes Unidos), Clase III.
Creo que sólo tienen una unidad


https://twitter.com/kad_ghani/status/13 ... 3448963077


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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Dom Nov 15, 2020 6:33 pm

Video de la familia de drones israelí Hero.

https://twitter.com/will_pulido/status/ ... 6349957120
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Orel el Lun Nov 16, 2020 11:11 am

:arrow: Sigue avanzando:
DARPA awards contracts for teaming manned and autonomous aircraft in aerial dogfighting

DARPA is moving on to the next phase of its Air Combat Evolution (ACE) programme: teaching autonomous programs to team with human pilots in combat.
The research agency recently awarded contracts to five companies to develop air combat manoeuvering algorithms for individual and team tactics. The firms awarded contracts under Technical Area 1 of the ACE programme are Boeing, EpiSci, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Heron Systems and physicsAI.

Each team is tasked with developing artificial intelligence agents that expand one-on-one engagements to two-on-one and two-on-two within-visual-range aerial battles,” says DARPA. “The companies’ algorithms will be tested in each of three programme phases: modelling and simulation, sub-scale unmanned aircraft, and full-scale combat representative aircraft scheduled in 2023 with L-39 Albatros.”

That work might eventually merge with The US Air Force Research Laboratory’s Skyborg programme, a parallel effort to develop an artificially intelligent loyal wingman UAV.
Ultimately, DARPA wants its ACE programme to contribute to its vision of Mosaic Warfare, a futuristic warfighting concept where the USA would overwhelm an enemy with a large and varied force of autonomous weapons, supervised by humans.

https://www.flightglobal.com/fixed-wing ... 29.article


:arrow: Taiwán va a probar la integración de su misil aire-aire TC-1 en su drón MALE Teng Yun:
http://alert5.com/2020/11/15/taiwan-to- ... r-missile/

:arrow: Interesante:
Sikorsky plans to autonomously fly multiple UH-60 Black Hawks in formation in 2021

As part of Phase III contracts recently granted for DARPA’s Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System (ALIAS) programme, Sikorsky says it will fly three helicopters autonomously to explore formation flying and communication protocols between aircraft.

The company has yet to fly a single Black Hawk autonomously, a feat that it had anticipated doing this year, but says it is on track to accomplish that solo flight for the first time in 2021. It will then move on to the more complex multiple helicopter demonstration. Coronavirus restrictions and changing programme priorities caused the delay, the firm says.

Sikorsky owns two helicopters using ALIAS: its Sikorsky Autonomy Research Aircraft (SARA), which is a modified S-76B, and a UH-60A Black Hawk, which has had its mechanical flight controls replaced with fly-by-wire controls. For its part, the US Army is retrofitting one of its own UH-60Ms with ALIAS and expects the helicopter to be ready for autonomous flight next year. All three rotorcraft will be used in the multi-ship demonstrations.

ALIAS is intended as a possible retrofit programme for Black Hawks, including older mechanically controlled variants of the utility helicopter, such as the UH-60A, which would receive fly-by-wire control upgrades. But, Sikorsky says much of the technology is likely to also find its way onto the service’s two Future Vertical Lift programmes: Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) and Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA).

By freeing aviators from piloting work, Sikorsky believes ALIAS will allow them to focus on other tasks such as mission management. The company believes the system will not only automate helicopter piloting, but also do it faster, safer and better than humanly possible – performance that could help the aircraft survive on the battlefield.

The company is also running parallel efforts to insert ALIAS programme-developed technology, which it brands as Matrix, into civilian aircraft. Sikorsky declines to estimate a timeline for autonomous aircraft certification with the Federal Aviation Administration, but says it is working closely with the US regulator on the technology. To that end, the firm in January announced a co-development agreement with Erickson to retrofit that company’s S-64 Air Crane heavy lift helicopter with Matrix.

“Our work with Erickson presents an opportunity to do a proof of concept of Matrix technology in aerial firefighting and gain operational experience,” the company says.

Sikorsky also says it is working with an undisclosed customer to integrate Matrix onto an unspecified fixed-wing civilian aircraft.

BATTLEFIELD EDGE

The ALIAS programme announcement comes about two months after US Army Brigadier General Walter Rugen, director of the service’s Future Vertical Lift Cross Functional Team, told FlightGlobal that autonomous flight controls would allow army helicopters, such as FARA or FLRAA, to fly at speeds that are higher and altitudes that are lower than previously thought possible or safe. By flying low and fast, the army believes it can hide its rotorcraft from enemy radar behind hills and in valleys better than is possible with human pilots.

From such low altitudes, US Army helicopters can infiltrate enemy airspace and launch attacks or drop off troops. “The lower tier of the air domain is, in fact, decisive,” said Rugen. “We don’t have a problem that the high flyers do. We can hide in the clutter, show up at the time and place of our choosing to really create chaos in the enemy’s decision cycle.”

Igor Cherepinsky, director of Sikorsky Innovations, says flights below 100ft above ground level will be facilitated by ALIAS using a combination of Collins Aerospace’s Geiger-mode LIDAR, undisclosed electro-optical sensors, short-wave infrared cameras, digital terrain elevation data and GPS, among other technologies. That should give the system the ability to fly nap-of-the-earth at night, while avoiding controlled flight into terrain or collisions with power lines, he says.

Using LIDAR means ALIAS-equipped rotorcraft would be emitting energy that could be picked up by adversaries, but Cherepinsky says it is a necessary risk that can be managed. “If you want to see, you’re going to have to emit something. We don’t have passive sensors that can return range information,” he says. “The ALIAS system itself can manage whether it emits or doesn’t emit.”

Moreover, when flying low LIDAR emission concerns might be limited as the light is likely to be blocked by nearby hills and mountains, says Cherepinsky.

Sikorsky sees ALIAS being able to handle a range of complex scenarios. When it comes to dropping off troops in a landing zone, the technology won’t just run a pre-set plan, but will be able to help helicopters avoid unforeseen obstacles and enemy fire. The system should be able to detect blue forces and red forces, and make adjustments, including changing a helicopter’s angle of attack, instructing troop disembarkment and even turning the aircraft to block enemy fire, says Cherepinsky.

One of the most challenging aspects of making practical use of ALIAS will be communicating to the pilots and crew what the autonomous flight system is doing and planning to do next, says Cherepinsky. To that end, the company is exploring ways to display information on tablet computers, as well as augmented reality headsets for soldiers.

Still, the choice of tablets or helmet-mounted head-up displays might not be as important as how data is presented and in what volumes. That will be especially true as a helicopter autonomously zips along, a few hundred feet above the ground, making many complex flight control decisions simultaneously.

“Even though you are in the loop, you’re not in the loop in the millisecond to millisecond,” says Cherepinsky. “As a machine starts to make these decisions, we have to work with both pilots and crew in the back. How many of those decisions need to be approved and what happens? Just making sure there’s no information overload for humans is a big challenge related to what we’re working through right now.”

https://www.flightglobal.com/helicopter ... 28.article

Un saludo
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Lun Nov 16, 2020 3:05 pm

La Universidad Tecnológica de Delft, en colaboración con la Armada y la Guardia Costera de los Países Bajos, ha desarrollado un UAV ligero de despegue y aterrizaje vertical impulsado por hidrógeno. El dispositivo ya ha superado con éxito las pruebas en barcos, demostrando un tiempo de vuelo récord de más de 3,5 horas para las máquinas de su clase. El UAV que pesa 13 kg y una envergadura de 3 m está equipado con 12 motores eléctricos con hélices. El hidrógeno está alojado en un cilindro compuesto de 8,6 litros y alimenta una celda de combustible de 800 vatios que carga las baterías del vehículo.
Video: https://twitter.com/Kique_42/status/132 ... 34976?s=20
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Lun Nov 16, 2020 3:07 pm

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Lun Nov 16, 2020 4:22 pm

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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Mar Nov 17, 2020 12:54 pm

18 años gastando dinero público para producir esto.

Sobra decir que a Afganistán se mandaron drones comprados a Israel y a Iraq drones comprados a Estados Unidos.

https://twitter.com/jpereztriana/status ... 18854?s=20

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Intentaré explicar esto de forma que todo podamos entenderlo.
Es como si en este año 2020 te compras un Citroën AX de 1986 al precio de un BMX M5 (F90) actual.
Literalmente este proyecto nació totalmente muerto.

Es el UAV menos tecnológico que he visto en años. Ni tan siquiera los indios de DRDO harían una cosa tan mala, con un plazo tan dilatado y dilapidando tal cantidad de presupuesto.

https://twitter.com/PePo_25/status/1328 ... 61249?s=20
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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor Kique el Mar Nov 17, 2020 2:55 pm

Otro nuevo e interesante UAV de China.Supuestamente llamado V400 de Fengfei, es un vehículo eléctrico de transporte de despegue y aterrizaje vertical de ala compuesta, con un peso máximo de despegue de 400 kg, es actualmente el avión eVTOL de ala compuesta más grande de China.
https://twitter.com/RupprechtDeino/stat ... 7187072000


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Re: Aviones sin piloto (UAS, RPAS, UCAS, UAV, UCAV, drones)

Notapor poliorcetes el Mar Nov 17, 2020 3:54 pm

Nunca digas que éste es mi último sendero
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https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
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